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Potential Peak Energy Alert July 6-8

THIS IS A COURTESY NOTIFICATION TO ALERT YOU TO UPCOMING POTENTIAL PEAK ENERGY DAYS. YOUR ACTIONS DURING A PEAK EVENT MAY HELP YOU REDUCE YOUR CAPACITY OBLIGATION IN FUTURE YEARS.

ALERT: This week has the potential to set system peak day(s). The projection is for today, tomorrow, and Friday between 2:00 pm and 7:00 pm.

What can you do?

To assist you manage your cost, you are receiving Peak Load Contribution (PLC) Day updates from CQI Associates alerting you to the possibility of a PLC day.  Notice typically offer on days when the temperatures are over 90 degrees and humidity levels are high. Code red days are typical peak days. Over the summer on average 15 notices will be issued with the five hottest days being typically on of the peak days. To respond to the PLC notice you can reduce energy consumption by some of the following actions:

  • Raise air conditioning temperature settings by 2 degrees between 2 pm and 7 pm.
  • Reduce lighting especially in non-occupied areas.
  • Limit the operation of large energy consuming equipment during the time such as kilns, air compressors, test equipment, dish washers, etc.
  • Ensure HVAC systems are not heating at the same time air condition service is being provided.
  • Consider turning off air conditioning equipment or raising the temperature setting higher than 2 degrees if an area is not occupied for the time period of the PLC notice.
  • Control your plug load.  Unplug devices that do no not need to be charging.

What is Peak Load Contribution (PLC)?

PLC is your average peak demand measured on the five highest-demand days of the summer (June 1-September 30) PLC is also called “coincidental peak days” and is measured on your bill as a kilowatt charge (kW). The Pennsylvania New Jersey Maryland Interconnection LLC (PJM) is the Eastern Interconnection grid that operates the electric transmission system. The PJM will measure the five hottest days in the summer when the demand is the highest.  The typical peak period of the day is between 2 pm and 7 pm. The PJM reports the five Peak Days after the summer period is completed.

Your usage on the five days during the peak hours will be averaged and will become your PLC for the next summer period.  Your PLC for the upcoming PJM planning year starts June 1 of each year. The data is available by February preceding June 1 of the new planning year.

Why is PLC important?

The PLC is important because you can control your capacity obligation for the upcoming year by controlling or curtailing the demand on the PJM’s peak days. By reducing your consumption and demand load during potential PLC hours you can lower your cost for the upcoming year.  This savings will be passed on to you through future electricity contracts.

CQI Associates can work with you to improve and develop programs to optimize energy consumption, thus helping to decrease your PLC load and eventually future electricity bills. For assistance email Melissa Anderson at melissa@cqiassociates.com.

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